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Ravens 2020 Draft: Day 3 Instant Reaction Roundtable

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL: NOV 09 East Carolina at SMU Photo by George Walker/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Baltimore Beatdown Staff’s instant reactions to the Ravens Day 3 selections during the 2020 NFL Draft:

#143 Ben Bredeson, OG, Michigan


Vasilis Lericos

The Ravens continue to bolster their offensive line with Bredeson, a fourth round value pick. Ben was team captain and four year starter that brings NFL size and anchor ability. He is not a nimble run blocker, but the coaching staff should be able to put him in position to succeed. Double dipping with interior blockers was smart considering Marshal Yanda’s retirement.


Dustin Cox

Bredeson was a guy I loved as a Day 3 option for the offensive line. Bredeson won’t wow you with athleticism, but what he does offer is strong run blocking from the guard position. Bredeson joins Ben Powers and Tyre Phillips in the competition for the right guard void left by Marshal Yanda. At the very least, Baltimore has secured their depth chart along the interior of the offensive line.


Frank Platko

As a Michigan fan, I like this pick. As a Ravens fan, I also like this pick.

Bredeson was a four-year starter for the Wolverines and could very well find himself starting for the Ravens in due time. He’s smart, uses his hands well and fits the scheme. Bredeson was actually a four-star tackle prospect during his college recruitment so like Phillips, he brings some versatility to the table, too.


Spencer Schultz

Bredeson is an experienced, smart, sound guard who will start by year two. He has high level hand usage and is mobile. Bredeson is versed in zone and power concepts, works well on the move and has extremely high level recognition against twists and stunts. Another four star recruit from a Power-5 school, Eric DeCosta continues knocking them out of the park.


Jakob Ashlin

The front office adds another quality interior offensive lineman in Ben Bredeson. He is a strong, technically sound guard, who fits well within the Ravens run-heavy offense, but he does lack elite athleticism.

Guard was a priority entering the draft, but now, they have plenty of options with Bredeson, Patrick Mekari, Ben Powers, and Tyre Phillips. Some extremely talented edge rushers were still on the board in Bradlee Anae and Curtis Weaver, but they could always move up from 170.


#170 Broderick Washington Jr., DT, Texas Tech


Vasilis Lericos

Baltimore’s “meat and potatoes” 2020 draft continues with another defensive tackle, this time the pure run stuffer variety. Washington profiles as a “red star” player known for his leadership. His scouting report describes an aggressive block eater with great strength and violent hands. This selection will create a fierce training camp competition among defensive tackles for roster spots.


Frank Platko

Another defensive tackle here in the fifth round is surprising. I don’t dislike Washington as a player but it’s surprising that the Ravens still didn’t take an edge-rusher with names like Bradlee Anae and Jonathan Garvin still on the board. They’re clearly sticking with their offseason theme of beefing up the defensive front and preparing for the future.

Between Daylon Mack, Justin Ellis, Justin Madubuike and Washington, the battle for roster spots and playing time behind Brandon Williams at DT is going to be highly contested.


Spencer Schultz

Washington, a two-time team captain at TTU, fits the leadership theme of the Ravens draft class. He played in a 3-3-5 stack defense for the Red Raiders, and is adept at taking on double teams. He has a strong punch and is a violent, physical player. Washington may never be an elite NFL starter, but I view him as a run-stuffing role player who unsurprisingly sticks around in the league for a long time. He will compete with Daylon Mack and Justin Ellis for playing time at nose and three technique.


Dustin Cox

DeCosta continues to add young depth to the defensive line with the selection of Broderick Washington Jr. Washington provides depth at nose tackle. With Brandon Williams’ time in Baltimore potentially nearing an end in a year or two, adding several defensive linemen is smart. Between Daylon Mack, Justin Madubuike, and Washington, hopefully at least one of them will step up as a consistent player up front for Baltimore.


Jakob Ashin

I am a bit baffled by this pick. Washington was a good run stuffer at Texas Tech and projects to add depth behind Brandon Williams. However, edge rusher is a need, and Bradlee Anae was still on the board. Another playmaker such as Hunter Bryant or Donovan Peoples-Jones would have made sense too.


#201 James Proche, WR, Southern Methodist


Vasilis Lericos

The Ravens needed to add another playmaker in this draft and Eric DeCosta delivered when he traded up for the SMU sleeper. Proche is an extremely productive pass catcher known for his exquisite hands and competitiveness. He also boasts valuable punt return ability. Proche is an undersized “Z” receiver who should complement Lamar Jackson and the Ravens offensive system.


Frank Platko

In a draft defined by double-dipping, Eric DeCosta surprised us by trading up to the 201st overall pick to select WR James Proche. Proche was viewed by many as one of the biggest sleepers at the receiver position in this draft class, much like Devin Duvernay.

The 5-foot-10 dynamo caught over 300 passes for nearly 4,000 yards and 40 touchdowns in his four-year career at SMU. He’ll add additional pass-catching acumen to an offense that needs it and brings special teams value, too. Good player and good value.


Dustin Cox

DeCosta doubles down at the receiver position by taking James Proche after trading up with the Vikings in the sixth round. Proche has great hands and was great in contested catch situations in college. Proche could be an immediate special teams contributor while providing depth at wide receiver.


Spencer Schultz

DeCosta takes the lottery ticket approach at ILB, IOL, IDL and WR, making two selections at each position with a RB cherry on top.

Proche is an older prospect, already 24 years old. He has an extremely low drop rate, to go along with Devin Duvernay’s strong hands and low drop rate. Proche. Catches. Everything. He understands leverage and zone coverage, while lacking twitch as a route runner. Proche is fluid, while not quite explosive. He’s also dangerous after the catch, and attended DeSoto High School, where current Ravens coach Zach Orr and second round pick Laviska Shenault attended. Two Texas kids with great hands have been inserted into the Ravens receiver room.


Jakob Ashlin

Like Devin Duvernay, James Proche was an extremely productive receiver in college. Over the past two seasons, he had 204 receptions for 2,424 yards and 27 touchdowns. Drafting another receiver was a smart move, and Proche fits well with the other pieces the Ravens have. He thrives at catching contested passes and should lineup on the outside, allowing Duvernay to work in the slot.


#219 Geno Stone, S, Iowa


Vasilis Lericos

Although limited athletically, Stone is admired in the analytic community. His rare instincts and intelligence allowed him to make ‘splash’ plays at the collegiate level. Stone continues the theme of this draft as a competitive, high-character player. He projects as a backup strong safety and special teams contributor. Ultimately, the Ravens addressed their need at safety with a high-floor prospect.


Frank Platko

Eric DeCosta’s final selection is one of my favorites of the draft. Stone is a great value pick and probably should have been gone by this point. He won’t wow anyone with athletic traits or testing but compensates with intangibles and instincts.

He has legitimate upside as a single-high and split safety who can roam in the backend and process quarterback reads. Stone has range and fills a depth-based need behind Earl Thomas III at the safety position.


Dustin Cox

DeCosta selects safety Geno Stone with his final pick of the 2020 NFL Draft. What Stone lacks in desired traits, he makes up for with football IQ. Stone adds another safety for ‘Wink’ Martindale to play with in different packages if he is ready to touch the field, but most importantly, he should be an immediate contributor to special teams.


Evan Burns

Many people overlook the fact that the Ravens special teams units are part of what separates them from other teams. Every year, it turns out to be the difference between a win and a loss. At a minimum, Geno Stone makes their special teams unit better by having enough speed to get down field and enough form and toughness to make tackles.

Even better, he adds depth to an already stacked secondary, Earl Thomas isn’t getting any younger. While it’s highly unlikely that Stone fills Thomas’s shoes, he is still a steal at pick 219.


Spencer Schultz

Geno Stone is a certified bruiser in the open field. He has only allowed nine first downs in coverage since the start of the 2017 season, the fewest of any player with significant snaps during that time. He brings the noise day in and day out, a high character “red star” player that PFF absolutely loves. Stone was 53rd on their draft board, yet another blue blood player, team captain and absolute steal from the best talent evaluator in the NFL. Hats off, EDC.


Jakob Ashlin

I have absolutely no idea how Geno Stone was still available here. I considered him to be a top 100 player in this class. You can’t ask for better value from a 7th round pick. He is a very tough player, who never gives up on a play. He has all the tools to be a special teams standout immediately.