FanPost

Grading Offensive Linemen in the 2019 NFL Draft

Greetings from the creator of the famous BTSC Big Board. My team has no particular need for Offensive Linemen this year but I love the class. Since you guys seem to be focused on the OL I am taking the opportunity to start a discussion of the prospects using the data I've compiled as a starting point.

I encourage someone on this list to copy the whole bloody thing, customize it to a Ratbirds Ravens-specific point of view, and then republish it with duly adjusted grades and discussion.

All I require is acknowledgement that it was "adapted from" the BTSC source so that your draftniks will be reminded of where to go to for discussion on other prospects. Here are a few follow-up notes for whoever does that:

  1. You will want to copy everything over to a word processing file for easy sorting, with a column added for alphabetizing by last name.
  2. You will need to use the Fanpost system because the SB Nation articles editor will not allow for tables. Your EIC can promote it to the front page if that is deemed to be desirable, which it almost certainly is.
  3. To make the Fanpost go to "visual view" and then "paste from Word". Finer editing has to be done in HTML.
  4. More generally, this is the ideal format to keep notes on any research you've done and particularly any nice scouting reports you've found around the Web. Just add the link with a brief description and everyone will be able to follow in your footsteps.

Enjoy. You should all feel triply-free to critique the grades in the Comments section. First, I have not really looked at the OL class in depth so these are all impressions more than true grades. Second, I have done absolutely nothing to customize them to your team needs (FWIW my rule is to first get the true "Highest Value" to the team and to then discount downward for issues and/or lack of need). Third, I am of course a Steelers fan and thus my opinions deserve to be roasted, grilled, and served with a nice Chianti. :wink:

Organized by Highest Value ("HV#") with no adjustment for team fit. An HV of 1:25 means the player is a reach at any point before Pick # 25 overall but good value at any point from the end of the 1st on. Getting that player in the early 2nd would be fine, while getting him in the late 2nd would almost be a steal. Yes, this system results in a certain amount of grade inflation for positions of need because we are talking about the "highest" grade, not the one where a player is expected to go; grades are never pushed up just because of need, however. Players with the same HV# are more-or-less equivalent so don't sweat the order inside each grouping. NOTE: We have no way but second hand rumor to account for the all-important intangibles like work ethic and locker room fit, which creates a huge margin of error that the teams do not have to deal with because they can actually meet the young men. Take that into account.

Rounds are subdivided as follows:

  • 1st Round grades: 1:01, 1:05, 1:10, 1:15, 1:20, or 1:25.
  • 2nd & 3rd Round grades: Early (#:01), Mid (#:12), or Late (#:24).
  • 4th to 7th Round grades: Early (#:01) or Late (#:16).

HV

DESCRIPTION

1:05

OL/TACKLE Andre Dillard, Wash. St. 6'5", 315 lbs. Maybe a tiny bit undersized but the best overall SPARQ athlete of the class, good technique, and especially noteworthy feet. Projects as a fantastic pass blocker who needs to work on digging opponents out in the run game. Top 10 talent for the right team.

1:05

OL/TACKLE Jawaan Taylor, Florida. 6'5", 312 lbs. So much talent, athleticism, and basically sound tape that he is almost sure to go in Round 1 even though he will need coaching to achieve true NFL technique. My personal guess would be the Broncos at 1:10 as a "welcome aboard" gift from Elway to Coach Munchak. Here are some equally enthusiastic reviews in the NFL.com scouting profile, the Draft Network scouting profiles and a deeper gif-supported scouting report from Kyle Crabbs. This gif-supported scouting report by retired NFL D-Lineman Stephen White calls Taylor a "run, don't walk" Right Tackle prospect who only got beat by the likes of Josh Allen and Montez Sweat, and gave them a fair share of the business in return.

1:10

OL/GUARD/TACKLE Cody Ford, Oklahoma. 6'3¾", 329 lbs. The feet are good enough to get drafted as a Right Tackle but his calling card is power and the NFL.com scouting profile agrees that he may be even better as a Guard. It's easy to see him as a perpetual all-pro from Year 3 on. Here is a December scouting rave [ahem] profile from Jon Ledyard along with an equally complimentary follow-up from the entire Draft Network crew.

1:10

OL/TACKLE Jonah Williams, Alabama. 6'4½", 302 lbs. Per former NFL D-Lineman Stephen White: Jonah Williams can be a franchise Left Tackle in the NFL, short arms be damned. ‘Nuff said from a man who ought to know. And if he fails at Tackle he'd be just as good or better inside. Lance Zierlein has reported conversations with several NFL O-Line coaches who have said Williams is also the best Center prospect of the class, and he seemed to give that idea full credit.

1:15

OL/GUARD/CENTER Chris Lindstrom, Boston Coll. 6'3¾", 308 lbs. A complete Guard with the ability to play Center too. Lindstrom is a wonderful athlete who's all but plug and play ready to start in the pro game and will be picked in Round 1 or 2 if there is any justice in the world. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile.

1:20

OL/CENTER/GUARD Garrett Bradbury, NC State. 6'2⅞", 306 lbs. A great athlete overall with everything you want in a Center but true country strength; a nimble-footed, throwback player fans will appreciate. The Draft Network scouting profiles, the NFL.com scouting profile, and almost all other pundits paint him as a solid mid- to late-1st talent for the right team.

1:20

OL/GUARD/TACKLE/CENTER Dalton Risner, Kansas St. 6'4¾", 312 lbs. The most versatile lineman in the draft and an easy Round 1 talent in most years, who might drop to Round 2 in this one. The NFL.com scouting profile grades him as an instant starter who is more mobile, technically sound, and tough than huge and mauling. The Draft Network scouting profiles would agree. This article calls him a Top 40 talent after a tremendous Senior Bowl. Here is a gif-supported scouting report from February.

1:25

OL/TACKLE/GUARD Yodny Cajuste, W. Va. 6'4⅞", 312 lbs. His footwork could definitely improve but that is coachable and he'd be a late-1st prospect in most drafts who is probably a 2nd-rounder in this one. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile (less complimentary than most) and the Draft Network scouting profiles.

1:25

OL/TACKLE Greg Little, Ole Miss. 6'5¼", 310 lbs. with apelike 35¼" arms and corresponding 10¼" hands. Designed by nature to be an offensive tackle but a perpetual underachiever with technical flaws. All he needs is a really great coach. A developmental fringe-1st talent for the right team who could conceivably fall in this deep class. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles, the NFL.com scouting profile, and a Draft Wire scouting profile.

1:25

OL/CENTER Erik McCoy, Texas A&M. 6'3⅞", 303 lbs. A Center who would be the easy #1 in many classes but has serious competition this year from Bradbury. Think Pouncey but without over-the-top athleticism. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles.

2:01

OL/CENTER Elgton Jenkins, Miss. St. 6'4½", 310 lbs. An efficient and solid technician without any flash who gets the job done on a week in, week out basis against the SEC's best. Film watchers will love him. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles.

2:24

OL/GUARD/CENTER Connor Mcgovern, Penn St. 6'5⅜", 308 lbs. with long 34⅛" arms. Big, strong and with the native athleticism to be even more mobile than he was in college, the NFL.com scouting profile suggests that Mcgovern would slot best into an inside zone and gap scheme. Here is the Draft Network scouting profiles page as well.

3:01

OL/GUARD Nate Davis, UNC Charlotte. 6'3¼", 316 lbs. A dominant small school Tackle who projects to be a pretty good Guard prospect for the NFL. He really stood out at the Senior Bowl. The NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles admire the power, mobility and potential but note several areas where his technique needs help. Here is a New Year scouting profile.

3:01

OL//GUARD/CENTER Michael Deiter, Wisconsin. 6'5⅛", 309 lbs. Very strong, technically sound and exceptionally good at pulling. Built like a shorter-armed Tackle but may be more comfortable inside because he has some issues with really fast edge rushers; though he has the potential to play across the line if coaching can help him develop a deeper pass set for the edge. He confirms that Tackle is probably out in this January interview. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles. The NFL.com scouting profile likes the technique and strength but questions the athleticism (bottom 25% SPARQ score). Deiter gets some good discussion in the comments section of this January scouting profile on his teammate from our sister site for the Giants. Had a fine Senior Bowl week.

3:01

OL/GUARD/TACKLE Tytus Howard, Alabama St. 6'5", 322 lbs. A favorite sleeper of OL junkies around the Draftverse, Howard is a multisport athlete from a very small program who outgrew his QB and TE roots (by a lot!) and has evolved into a solid if developmental OL-prospect for the NFL. The NFL.com scouting profile emphasizes a fine showing against Auburn (to answer LOC questions) and opines that he is an athletic player with coachable problems (mostly false steps). This to-the-point February scouting profile follows identical reasoning, as does this Cardinals oriented scouting profile from January. The Draft Network scouting profiles page agrees that he has the tools but not the technical grounding. This solid-looking March scouting profile notes his impressive Senior Bowl week, highlighted by constant improvement, and ends with an "easy Day 2" grade. His extremely poor Combine will require some double checking but is belied by the film.

3:01

OL/GUARD Drew Samia, Oklahoma. 6'4¾", 305 lbs. A 4-year starter at Tackle who made up for his lack of size with exceptional athleticism. The Draft Network scouting profiles laud Samia as "One of the best pulling offensive linemen in the country [and] consistently explosive out of his stance." The NFL.com scouting profile notes that he was the OL leader of this very good group, and describes him as "a loose-limbed, athletic guard [with good] foot quickness and second-level agility [but] issues with core strength and body control at the point of attack."

3:12

OL/GUARD Beau Benzschawel ("BEN-shawl"), Wisconsin. 6'6¼", 309 lbs. Tall but not exceptionally long, the NFL.com scouting profile describes him as a "tall, pass-blocking specialist who will need to prove he can be serviceable against NFL power in the run game." Zierlein also describes him as being technically accomplished with a high football IQ and the sort of multi-sport athlete you like to see; just underpowered in a notable way. The Draft Network scouting profile describes a totally opposite player who is "Strong as hell [and a] very capable power player who will lock horns in tight spaces effectively [but is] rather rigid in his pass sets." This January scouting profile from our sister site for the Giants likes both his power and his pass sets, but not the way he moves in space. NOTE: the comments are worth more than the text and point to some balance issues. Had a fine Senior Bowl week.

3:24

OL/TACKLE Chuma Edoga, USC. 6'3½", 308 lbs. with really long 34⅞" arms (81⅛" wingspan), exceptional feet, and top notch athleticism overall. A standout pass protector at the Senior Bowl. The NFL.com scouting profile calls him "a smooth, athletic run-blocker and an uneven, unrefined pass protector" who needs to work on his core strength and anchor. The Draft Network scouting profiles agrees that a lack of core strength and a poor anchor are his overwhelming Achilles heel.

3:24

OL/CENTER/GUARD Lamont Gaillard, Georgia. 6'2⅝", 305 lbs. with big, powerful 10⅜" hands. A favorite sleeper for son-of-an-OL-coach Lance Zierlein, whose NFL.com scouting profile describes Gaillard as a "three-year starter and team captain whose tenacity and dirt-dog mentality typifies the Georgia offensive line... Tougher than old brisket." Not an ideal player from the neck down but it would be hard to find a better one the shoulders up. A lot of his flaws are coachable and cleaning them up could reveal a much better mover in space.

3:24

OL/GUARD/CENTER Michael Jordan, Ohio St. 6'5⅞", 307 lbs. with long 34¼" arms. A high ceiling prospect who possesses both the athleticism and frame to be even bigger, stronger, and more mobile than he was in college. The NFL.com scouting profile identifies Jordan's main weakness as simple reaction time that was less of an issue at Guard than Center. Thinking too much? The Draft Network scouting profiles page loves the tools but hates the footwork.

3:24

OL/GUARD Ben Powers, Oklahoma. 6'3⅞", 310 lbs. A football player to his bones with a game based on power more than athleticism and mobility. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles.

4:01

OL/GUARD/TACKLE Bobby Evans, Oklahoma. 6'4⅜", 312 lbs. with long 34¾" arms. A 3-year starter at Tackle who gets special praise in both the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile for exceptional core strength to fight off bull rushes, mobility in space, and powerful hands when he lands them. His limits getting depth against really fast edge rushers limit the upside, and there are the usual array of technique problems endemic in college linemen.

4:01

OL/TACKLE/GUARD Max Scharping, N. Ill. 6'5⅞", 327 lbs. A Right Tackle prospect who could probably slide in to play Guard, Scharping earned a really good grade from Lance Zierlein (an OL coach's son) in the NFL.com scouting profile. Zierlein praised his "impressive combination of size and functional athletic ability" but reading between the lines suggests a thought that Scharping's array of technical flaws would be relatively easy to fix if he's as coachable as they say. The Draft Network scouting profiles hint at the same idea: "the process isn't as good as the results."

5:01

OL/GUARD Mitch Hyatt, Clemson. 6'5⅜", 303 lbs. with long 34⅛" arms and big 10¼" hands. A slightly undersized but great athlete who needs a serious year of work with an NFL strength coach, and another with a good enough coach to help him fix some significant technical flaws. Played Tackle in college but that is anyone's guess for the NFL. The NFL.com scouting profile sees him as a smart, locker room leader with a chance to be a zone-scheme Guard with backup Tackle flexibility - if the aforementioned conditioning takes hold. The Draft Network scouting profiles agree, assigning a solid if Day 3 grade. He tested out with a very respectable athletic profile heavy on the length and maneuverability side.

5:01

OL/TACKLE/GUARD Isaiah Prince, Ohio St. 6'6½", 305 lbs. with gibbonesque 35½" arms. Both the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles describe him as a true boom or bust prospect who offers all the NFL potential you could want offset by serious waist-bending and footwork issues that could make success impossible.

5:16

OL/TACKLE/GUARD Ross Pierschbacher, Alabama. 6'3½", 306 lbs. with unusually short 32⅛" arms. A solid, effective, and experienced 4-year starter who is likely to make a team but he seems to be just a guy who lacks the length you look for in a tackle, the bulk you look for in a Guard, or some other special asset to separate him from the pack. The NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles use words like "cerebral," "clean" and "technically sound" but worries about the lack of power.

6:01

OL/GUARD Garrett Brumfield, LSU. 6'2", 300 lbs. A bit undersized for a Guard but the Draft Network scouting profile suggests he might be blessed with enough mobility and nasty to be a fine Day 3 flier.

6:01

OL/TACKLE David Edwards, Wisconsin. 6'6¼", 308 lbs. As explained in the NFL.com scouting profile Edwards is a QB turned TE turned OL with good feet but a need to work on his strength and technique. The Draft Network scouting profile likes the strength and athleticism but also sees the need for a lot of development. Bottom 10% SPARQ results tend to support the athletic questions.

6:01

OL/GUARD Phil Haynes, Wake Forest. 6'3⅝", 322 lbs. A small school titan who projects as an effective road grader even in the NFL, though it will obviously take some good coaching to make that leap. Team fit will matter because he's not the most mobile kid in the world. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile and the very similar Draft Network scouting profiles page.

6:01

OL/GUARD/TACKLE Kaleb McGary, Washington. 6'7⅛", 317 lbs. but with surprisingly short 32⅞" arms that negate some of his length. A multiyear starter who looks like a Tackle standing up but moves and plays like a good, tough, but too-tall Guard. Will grade higher for teams willing to bet on his Right Tackle upside despite the movement issues highlighted in the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles.

6:16

OL/GUARD Alex Bars, Notre Dame. 6'5⅞", 312 lbs. A budding star (for college) and multiyear starter who suffered a twin ACL/MCL tear in 2018. He would have been a Day 2 prospect despite some severe waist-bending issues but will now get a severe discount from everyone. It sucks even to write those words.

6:16

OL/TACKLE Olisaemeka "Oli" Udo, Elon. 6'5½", 323 lbs. with extraordinary 35⅜" arms. A small school physical specimen who looked very solid at the Shrine Game. The NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles page both describe him as an all-traits, no-technique draft-and-stash developmental project.

7:01

OL/TACKLE Cody Conway, Syracuse. 6'6", 296 lbs. Better at pass protection than run blocking, which makes a transition to Guard even harder for someone who may be as tough as nails but will need at least a year of work with an NFL strength coach and some flexibility training to loosen up in the hips. Good hand work and understanding of leverage.

7:16

OL/GUARD Lester Cotton, Alabama. 6'4", 325 lbs. Can you spell ‘road grader'? He isn't exactly immobile he's darned close until he gets moving, at which point he's darned hard to stop. A late round bargain for a power-oriented, play-in-a-phone-booth system; off the board for teams that require Guards to pull and to hit the second level.

The opinions posted here are those of the writer of this article. They are in no way official comments from the team, the editors of this site or SB Nation as a whole, and should not be misconstrued as such.

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